Akha pipe [tobacco], most commonly smoked by elderly women who smoke the leaves from the plants they cultivate themselves.
Photo by writer, photographer and traveller Philip Game

Akha pipe [tobacco], most commonly smoked by elderly women who smoke the leaves from the plants they cultivate themselves.

Photo by writer, photographer and traveller Philip Game

Akha women sing [or chant] field songs as they travel to and from their fields. There are not traditional words to the songs, they are made up and vary each time. Usually the songs reflect on the difficulty of life, or memories of the past. The constant in the songs is the sound and tone. In this video, we hear an Akha woman from Chiang Rai, Thailand who is chanting a passage from a Bible verse at Akha Outreach Media.

Used with permission.

akhadesigns:

Subject: Traditional Akha Flatware: Bowl, Cups, Spoon.

Project: Akha Outreach Media Lightbox Test

Camera: iPhone4

Treatment: Square Crop, Levels

Via Akha Designs


Burmese (Akha) hat via The Victoria & Albert Museum

(via: omgthatdress)

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Burmese (Akha) hat via The Victoria & Albert Museum

(via: omgthatdress)

Via OMG that dress!


Thai (Akha) ensemble via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

(via omgthatdress)

Thai (Akha) ensemble via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

(via omgthatdress)

Via OMG that dress!

elhieroglyph:

AKHA TRIBE
OLD CHINESE COINS, TEXTILE, GLASS BEADS, FIBMETAL CHAINS Akha women are easily recognized by their elaborate headdress, usually decorated in a great deal of silver and beads. The women’s black, long-sleeved jacket is richly decorated with fine, colorful appliquÈ work in geometric patterns, and may include sewn on silver studs or cowrie shells. The Akha female’s chest ornament is one of the most highly prized symbols of status within the tribe. Hand hammered silver geometric and flower motifs are most valued.

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elhieroglyph:

AKHA TRIBE

OLD CHINESE COINS, TEXTILE, GLASS BEADS, FIBMETAL CHAIN

Akha women are easily recognized by their elaborate headdress, usually decorated in a great deal of silver and beads. The women’s black, long-sleeved jacket is richly decorated with fine, colorful appliquÈ work in geometric patterns, and may include sewn on silver studs or cowrie shells. The Akha female’s chest ornament is one of the most highly prized symbols of status within the tribe. Hand hammered silver geometric and flower motifs are most valued.

Via EL HIEROGLYPH

elhieroglyph:

AKHA: TWO SILVER EARRING PAIRS,TWO CHILDREN’S HEADDRESSES, AND TWO ADULT HEADDRESSES

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elhieroglyph:

AKHA: TWO SILVER EARRING PAIRS,
TWO CHILDREN’S HEADDRESSES, AND TWO ADULT HEADDRESSES

Via EL HIEROGLYPH

To help make our life a little easier, we are combining the Akha tumblog with the new Akha posterous : http://akha.posterous.com

Dsc00264

Please bear with us as we make these changes.

The Akha swing festival

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The Akha swing festival

Burmese artist’s depiction of the Akha people, circa 1900 (?). 
Can any of our Burmese followers translate the Burmese for us?
via Wikipedia topic Akha

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Burmese artist’s depiction of the Akha people, circa 1900 (?). 

Can any of our Burmese followers translate the Burmese for us?

via Wikipedia topic Akha

An Akha woman shelling corn (Aqpiq ardu pyav-eu)
At the beginning of the rainy season, many Akha families harvest corn from their personal fields. Some of the corn is eaten off the cob, usually cooked over an open fire. Occasionally, the kernels are ground into corn meal (ardu cehrmeu) which is used to make into a warm pudding (similar to a rice pudding, and often cooked with a small amount of chicken).  Most of the harvest, however, is used to feed the livestock: specifically chickens.
When the corn is fully grown, the Akha go into their fields with loosely woven baskets (khavkar) to gather their harvest. The corn husks (ardu arkhawf) are removed and burned, and the corn is then laid out on rice bags (pehrzeur) to dry in the sun. Once dried, the entire harvest is shelled by hand into individual kernels (ardu dumyav).
The chickens are, most commonly, fed these kernels whole along with uncooked rice grains. Some of the families that do not raise many chickens or who have larger fields will sell the corn, but they still shell the entire crop because they receive a much better price for shelled kernels than for full ears.
Once shelled, the corn cobs (ardu arkahq) are, most commonly, used as fuel for the family fire. Currently, most families still cook their daily meals over indoor, open, wood-fueled fires. The shelled cobs add to the family fuel supplies.
The season of shelling corn is a unique time in an Akha community. Because most families are shelling corn and the people in the villages go about their daily tasks: visiting neighbors, having conversations, drinking tea, or just passing the time; everyone is free to join in and help shell the cobs in the home that they have entered.
At the end of the season, most of the younger children have large blisters on the outside of their thumbs, but as they grow in their agricultural experiences the callouses soon harden those soft hands. Before long, the children join their parents and grandparents in their ability to stick their hands (briefly) into open flame in order to stoke the fire and pick up boiling-hot pots and pans without feeling pain.

An Akha woman shelling corn (Aqpiq ardu pyav-eu)

At the beginning of the rainy season, many Akha families harvest corn from their personal fields. Some of the corn is eaten off the cob, usually cooked over an open fire. Occasionally, the kernels are ground into corn meal (ardu cehrmeu) which is used to make into a warm pudding (similar to a rice pudding, and often cooked with a small amount of chicken).  Most of the harvest, however, is used to feed the livestock: specifically chickens.

When the corn is fully grown, the Akha go into their fields with loosely woven baskets (khavkar) to gather their harvest. The corn husks (ardu arkhawf) are removed and burned, and the corn is then laid out on rice bags (pehrzeur) to dry in the sun. Once dried, the entire harvest is shelled by hand into individual kernels (ardu dumyav).

The chickens are, most commonly, fed these kernels whole along with uncooked rice grains. Some of the families that do not raise many chickens or who have larger fields will sell the corn, but they still shell the entire crop because they receive a much better price for shelled kernels than for full ears.

Once shelled, the corn cobs (ardu arkahq) are, most commonly, used as fuel for the family fire. Currently, most families still cook their daily meals over indoor, open, wood-fueled fires. The shelled cobs add to the family fuel supplies.

The season of shelling corn is a unique time in an Akha community. Because most families are shelling corn and the people in the villages go about their daily tasks: visiting neighbors, having conversations, drinking tea, or just passing the time; everyone is free to join in and help shell the cobs in the home that they have entered.

At the end of the season, most of the younger children have large blisters on the outside of their thumbs, but as they grow in their agricultural experiences the callouses soon harden those soft hands. Before long, the children join their parents and grandparents in their ability to stick their hands (briefly) into open flame in order to stoke the fire and pick up boiling-hot pots and pans without feeling pain.

Distinct from the Lomi Akha and Ulo Akha headdresses, the Pami (Paqmif) Akha headdress folds over the crown of the head in a slightly rounded and padded appearance, in some ways reminiscent of an ancient samurai helmet.
This image was taken at Slm Bupo’s wedding, circa 2008.
Image copyright KLJ Photography, not for redistribution.

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Distinct from the Lomi Akha and Ulo Akha headdresses, the Pami (Paqmif) Akha headdress folds over the crown of the head in a slightly rounded and padded appearance, in some ways reminiscent of an ancient samurai helmet.

This image was taken at Slm Bupo’s wedding, circa 2008.

Image copyright KLJ Photography, not for redistribution.

The water belongs to the fish, the sky belongs to the birds and the mountains belong to the Akha.

Get to know about the Akha people of Northern Thailand. The 2 million Akha living in southeast Asia live simple lives in remote villages. Valuing family and their history, the Akha can recite their genealogy up to 70 generations. Akha culture and festivals center around rice, rice and the Akha are inseparable. The traditional religion of the Akha is animistic, but many Akha have become Christian.

Video taken from A New Joy, Akha Outreach Foundation’s promotional DVD. Edited and Produced by Kevin LJ.

Singing at an Akha New Rice Festival (cehr shuiv dzaq)
Akha women wearing Lomi Akha dress singing a song at a New Rice Festival in Northern Thailand.
Many Akha celebrations follow agricultural calendars, and the new rice festival is no exception. A large feast is prepared and neighboring villages are invited to come and join in the festivities. Songs, dances, speeches, eating and drinking are the primary activities, but the inspiration for the celebration is thanksgiving for the harvest.
This event takes place between late October and early December after the villages harvest their rice.

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Singing at an Akha New Rice Festival (cehr shuiv dzaq)

Akha women wearing Lomi Akha dress singing a song at a New Rice Festival in Northern Thailand.

Many Akha celebrations follow agricultural calendars, and the new rice festival is no exception. A large feast is prepared and neighboring villages are invited to come and join in the festivities. Songs, dances, speeches, eating and drinking are the primary activities, but the inspiration for the celebration is thanksgiving for the harvest.

This event takes place between late October and early December after the villages harvest their rice.

[Image]
Akha man in Tachilek, Myanmar walking to the fields with his Machete and bamboo sheath.

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[Image]

Akha man in Tachilek, Myanmar walking to the fields with his Machete and bamboo sheath.